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Occupied Times of London – the independent newspaper of Occupy London launches

 

Download your own copy in PDF format here: Occupied Times Issue One PDF

The Occupied Times of London, the independent newspaper of the Occupy London has launched its first edition. At the launch, held on the steps of St Paul’s, the first copy was handed over to the Museum of London who will frame and hold a copy in their collection.

Consisting of twelve A4 pages of comment, news and features alongside photos, cartoons and event listings, written largely by the camp’s occupants, there is an initial run of 2000 copies of its first newspaper. These are being distributed to protesters at the occupation, city workers and members of the public. The paper was founded by Steven Maclean, editor-in-chief, and has been created in just a week at the occupation in London.

Mircea Barbu, one of the editors of the paper, said; ”We hope that the Occupied Times of London reflects and records the movement, bringing together the wide range of voices of supporters as well as challenging the issues behind why we are all here. It’s the great thing about this occupation. You can come here and get involved immediately. You can even help us with the next issue which we’ve just started working on!”

After the launch, members of the team who created the paper answered questions about their motivations, the content of the first issue and what they hope to achieve through its production. There was also a debate looking at the statement “Are we anti-capitalists?”, which has been used to describe the occupation without necessarily understanding the complexities and the range of opinions that which make up the camp.

 

19 Responses to “Occupied Times of London – the independent newspaper of Occupy London launches”

  1. Will the paper be available online? I would really love to read it and share it via social media! 🙂

     
  2. Download the PDF! Clink on the link above

     
  3. The Newspaper Club might be able to help you printing the next copies: http://www.newspaperclub.com/about
    “Newspaper Club prints twice a week on Tuesday and Thursday, at 2pm London time. Delivery in the UK typically happens 3-4 days after printing, with newspapers often arriving before the weekend, but can take longer.
    If you need your newspapers in time for a special event, please let us know when ordering and often we can arrange that for you.”
    Drop me a line if you need graphic communication support

     
    • To quote “The Newspaper Club” website:
      “Newspaper Club was made by the Really Interesting Group…”

      …and to quote the “Really Interesting Group”:
      “We’ve done projects for clients like Apple, Nike, Innocent, Penguin, Umbro and the BBC.”

      Do you really want to print your paper with these corporate-friendly printers/designers when there are many fantastic printers’ co-ops in the UK you could be working with?

      to name just a few:
      http://www.footprinters.co.uk/
      http://www.calverts.coop/
      http://oxfordgreenprint.com/

       
  4. lovely job, looks great

     
  5. Fabulous! Is there a way to send in stuff to contribute?

     
  6. Can someone explain precisely how, following the abolition of the hated fractional reserve banking system and the dismantlement of any and all capitalist institutions and corporations, the state will have the wherewithal to pay pensions, benefits and civil servants’ salaries, increase investment in the NHS, etc. I am completely at a loss as to how this would all work in practice and wish that someone would set it out clearly so that I can make a rational rather than emotional decision whether to lend my support. I am not interested in emotional appeals to a general sense of unfairness and inequality – I get that – I just want to understand how hundreds of years of property law etc get rewritten in order to achieve the goal of wresting the 1%’s untold wealth from them to pay for the rest of us without a bloody revolution.

     
    • first of all, even though you might have the impression that that this is an anti-capitalist protest at St. Pauls – its not.
      The majority of the people who are camping out at St. Pauls are not of the opinion that capitalism must be destroyed. Anti-capitalist banners / posters etc of course which invariably are focused on by the media do not help this misperception of the direction aims and goals of occupylsx.
      These banners/ posters have now been taken down – in addition to the completely out of context and inappropriate pro-kurdish Ocalan posters.

      Quite why these were allowed, I have no idea.

      Just why would you expect a few hundred people camped out at St. Pauls to be able to offer practical, detailed solutions to how exactly the economic system should be reformed when the leaders of the UK and Europe are unable to do anything other than kick the can and ensure that the elites do not lose out?

      This is nothing unusual, its happened at various times thoughout the centuries, i.e English Civil war resulting in the execution of the King Charles I, who together with his son, who was also hated, adorn the archway to Paternoster Square, which was the original target for Occupylsx.

       
      • “Quite why these were allowed, I have no idea.”

        Why are OLSX disallowing things? Was there a vote on this?

        “This is nothing unusual, its happened at various times thoughout the centuries, i.e English Civil war resulting in the execution of the King Charles I, who together with his son, who was also hated, adorn the archway to Paternoster Square, which was the original target for Occupylsx.”

        I object to you cavalier attitude.

         
    • Google “Resource Based Economy” But there are other models. Remember most of the money in circulation and even solid gold bars are largely illusory: http://gold-quote.net/en/articles/fake-tungsten-gold-bars.php The fraud does not stop with CDS and derivatives…

       
      • Well, as far as my reading goes, the Resource Based Economy is at best a half baked idea. No specifics at all.

        For reading on alternatives to the current economic system, I would recommend the New Economics Foundation and http://www.positivemoney.org.uk/. The guys at Stamp Out Poverty are pretty savvy too – some proper economists in there. Or, for a critical take on orthodox economics, I would recommend the nobel prize winning Joseph Stiglitz – particularly a book called ‘Globalisation and its discontents’

         
  7. Matthew poses the crucial question that I imagine is something of a sticking point for many who are in the movement and for many, many more who would be if the question could be answered easily.

    The way I see it is that we cannot do this by adjusting the countless dials and levers that control the existing machine (economy/fiscal ‘law’), we need a brand new machine with far fewer dials and levers on it.

    I’m an advocate of the resource-based economy suggested by the Venus project and others but that raises the same gnarly problem as above – how do we move from here to there, once ‘there’ is sufficiently defined/agreed upon.

    Any mechanism that says ‘Mr Smith, yiou earned £100k a year before, our income levelling piola\\\\\\\\\\\\

     
  8. excellent work. creating a space for the protest to express its own voice (in whatever ways) is definitely needed. the deriding and dismissive tone of much of the press in the UK needs to be countered with a creative force showing that this movement isn’t just going to peter out.
    sending much solidarity from the island of Hong Kong, and also this blogpost i penned on the matter: http://lefolly.wordpress.com/2011/10/27/hypocrites-or-pragmatists/
    keep on.

     
  9. hi, I’m planning on popping down tomorrow afternoon – do you guys have a list of things you need etc?

     
  10. ignore last comment -I found the wishlist.

     
  11. Hi, just wanted to say the paper looks ace and you are all heroes. I was there on the first day of the protest and was completely overwhelmed with the amount of people from all backgrounds who have dedicated themselves to insuring there is some sort of a future to be had for us all.
    I’m an illustrator and have been working on some drawings based on the protests, you can have a look at them here…

    http://mrmrframe.wordpress.com/2011/10/27/they-are-the-change-you-were-looking-for/

    The blog explains it all but if you feel that in any way they would be useful to your publication let me know:) Once again, you are all heroes!

     
  12. I’m visiting as often as possible. I have found the demonstration to be intelligent and thoughtful.
    Of course there are no easy solutions to the state we’re in but this dialogue is the most interesting process I have participated in since the 1980’s when I lived at the women’s camp at Greenham Common. We received a similar negative response from most of the media, but, as is now history, maintained a presence there for many years.
    It is ridiculous to demand that we should be presenting a done and dusted manifesto when, in the case of Occupy London, concerned people have only come together for a matter of days, constantly under pressure from ‘the authorities’ never mind the inevitable discomfort of living on a pavement.
    I think it is also important to remember that a gathering of this sort would not be ‘permitted’ anywhere in the UK.
    It might as well be St. Paul’s, who initially it so happens, appeared to welcome the demonstration. Anybody under the illusion that a similar gathering could take place on Dartmoor, on the beach, in a forest, Hyde Park and so on and so forth is sadly mistaken.
    The irony is that conventional politicians have celebrated the occupation of significant locations in Tunisia, Libya, Tianemen Square anywhere, in fact, that they have decided has a regime which is not useful to them, always and in no uncertain terms, emphasising the importance of ‘democracy’.
    Occupy London is about democracy. We are saying we do not live in a democracy, we are not listened to, we do not live in a harmonious society of equal opportunity and justice and we will not continue to be complicit in a system that sanctions excessive profiteering whilst the elderly die of the cold, families are inadequately housed,etc.etc, children go to school without any breakfast. The long list of things which should make any compassionate human being unable to bear remaining silent.
    None of the foregoing has touched on the obscenity of famine and endless war.
    I’ve said enough already. I will continue to visit as often as I can.

     
  13. “Occupy London is about democracy. We are saying we do not live in a democracy, we are not listened to, we do not live in a harmonious society of equal opportunity and justice and we will not continue to be complicit in a system that sanctions excessive profiteering whilst the elderly die of the cold, families are inadequately housed,etc.etc, children go to school without any breakfast. The long list of things which should make any compassionate human being unable to bear remaining silent.”

    Do you really mean ‘equal opportunity’? Are you sure you don’t mean ‘equal outcome’?

    Which is the more compassionate: the society in which everything is automatically provided for by the state, or one in which people feel motivated to give to others, of their own free will?

    Which is more admirable: the father who plays with his child out of a sense of duty, or the father who plays with his child because of the joy it brings him?

    Do you believe that people should have the freedom to fail? Are you aware of how many times (and how badly) Steve Jobs failed, for example?

    Isn’t the welfare state effectively a bailout for the individual? If not then what might such a thing look like?

     

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